Lord & Goddard of Rutland, Vermont.

The partnership of Lord & Goddard was first advertised in July 1997. Their shop was located a few rods north of the Rutland Court House just opposite Messrs Pomeroy & Hooker’s store. At this location they advertised the manufacture of musical clocks and most kinds of gold and silverware. (Rutland Herald 7-3-1797.) The shop was moved in 1800 to the shop formerly occupied by Storer & Wilmont. This shop was located approximately 15 rods northwest from the Court House. Lord & Goddard’s partnership lasted approximately eight years and was dissolved on April 26th, 1805. A notice was placed in the Rutland Herald on this date. It appears they stayed close friends as their families remained close and involved with each other.

The tall case clocks that have been found signed by Lord & Goddard have the following numbers recorded…. 72, 75, 87, 95, 97, 98, 106, 111 and 113. Tall clocks signed by Nichols only include 124, 125, 144 and 150.

Benjamin Lord was born in Norwich, Connecticut on October 10, 1770 the son of Ebenezer and Temperance (Edgerton). He is first listed as a silversmith in 1793 when he advertised in the Western Star in Pittsfield, Massachusetts opposite the meeting house on the road to Lanesborough in 1796. It is recorded that in 1797, Benjamin moved into Rutland, Vermont and with in a few short months has formed a partnership with Nichols Goddard. Benjamin married Fanny Buel on January 28, 1799 in Convetry, Connecticut. Together, they had at least six children while putting roots down in this town. He becomes involved with public affairs and serves as town clerk in 1803 – 1813 and again in 1815 – 1826. He was a Captain in the local militia. In 1808, he is thought to have trained his nephew John Bliss as a clockmaker. Bliss becomes a well documented chronomometer maker in New York. Benjamin died on April 23, 1843 in Athens, Georgia.

Nichols Goddard was born the son of Nathan and Martha (Nichols) Goddard in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts on October 4, 1773. It is thought that he learned clockmaking from his second cousin Luther Goddard who was also in Shrewsbury. Luther was trained by his cousin, our country’s most famous clockmaker, Simon Willard of Grafton in 1778. Luther is often credited with making the first watch in America. Nichols is listed as working in Northampton, Massachusetts in 1794 through 1797. A diary entry from 1795 states that as a journeyman, Nichols made movements for his father Luther Goddard, Gardner Parker of Westborough, Isaac Gere of Northampton, MA and for a man identified as “Ingalls” who is also in Northhampton. In June of 1797, Goddard moves north to Rutland, Vermont. At this time, the period of 1770 through about 1825, the state of Vermont enjoyed unprecedented population growth. It is in Rutland that Goddard formed a partnership with a silversmith who was originally from Norwich, Connecticut and more recently Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His name was Benjamin Lord. In September of 1798, Nichols returned to Northampton to marry Charity White. She was the daughter of Job White and Charity Chapin. They returned to Rutland and had seven children together. After their partnership ended, Nichols continued to make clocks under his own name until he died in 1823.

Nichols involves himself in public affairs. In 1800 he is appointed Town Clerk of Rutland. He also serves as Town Treasurer from 1805 – 1807. He received the commission of Captain in the militia. He was also very active in the Masonic lodge. In 1802 he was elected Grand Junior Deacon of the Grand Masonic Lodge of Vermont and in 1804 through 1810 he served as Grand Senior Warden.

Nichols died in Rutland on September 23, 1823.

Lord & Goddard Rutland, Vermont. No. 98. A tall case clock.  -SOLD-

This is a wonderful inlaid cherry case tall clock having a painted dial signed by the Rutland, Vermont partnership of Lord… read more